Ask HN: Examples of desktop software with 20+ years of longevity?

Some desktop apps have been developed for 20+ years and still running and available. There are not many desktop apps with longevity (and rewrites).

Examples of apps still available:

- Quarx: QuarkXPress (1987)

- Corel: WordPerfect (bought by Corel in 1996), CorelDraw (1989)

- Xara: Xara (1994) - a Windows vector illustration app still in development

- Fontlab: Fontlab (1993 for Windows)

- Bare Bones Software: BBEdit (1993)

- UltraEdit: UltraEdit (1994)

- Borland/Embarcadero: Delphi (1995)

- Fantaisie Software: PureBasic (2000 for Windows)

- IBM/Eclipse Foundation: Eclipse (2001)

What other examples of desktop apps 20+ years old and still in development? (Excluding Microsoft, Apple and Adobe examples because everyone recognise their apps.)

66 points | by open-source-ux 282 days ago

83 comments

  • 0atman 282 days ago
    This is very normal in the open source world: Half of the desktop software included in a modern Linux distro I was using in the late 90s!

    From memory: VLC, GIMP, Blender, Audacity, Firefox, Gedit, OpenOffice, XBMC (now Kodi), FileZilla - the list is HUGE

    Find your favourites here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_free_and_open-source_s...

    • usr1106 282 days ago
      Emacs is from the 80s. (vi probably older, but it might be considered more different from a modern vim.)
  • ss48 282 days ago
    Notepad++ is close: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notepad%2B%2B, 19 years ago. It's text editing engine, Scintilla, is 24 years old https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scintilla_(software)

    Staroffice which became OpenOffice and Then Libreoffice would be another

    AutoCAD is 40 years old

    • adeon 282 days ago
      I love Notepad++. I dual-boot Windows and Linux and on Linux side it's all fancy neovim setups. But when I boot Windows to play games, it's always Notepad++ I use to edit game mods or their configuration etc.

      Happy to see it's still maintained, according to Wikipedia, last update this month. Even happier to see it's open source(!?) I can't remember if it was always open source or if it became open source at some point.

      • shrimp_emoji 282 days ago
        On Linux, I use Kate, the (imo superior) Notepad++. It even has vim bindings (which I turn on accidentally and then have to burn the editor with fire until it stops)!
        • g8oz 282 days ago
          Does Kate have a function list panel that supports Markdown headings? And the ability to define projects that include files from all over the file system rather than just one directory? Those are killer NP++ features for me.
      • qup 281 days ago
        I have similar fond memories. I think it's the first development tool I ever paid for, and I do think I paid for it.

        There was another editor that I liked at that time, though, and it's possible I'm confusing which one I paid for. But Notepad++ won in the end.

  • adamredwoods 282 days ago
    Adobe Products:

    Photoshop, the grand-daddy, released in 1990: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobe_Photoshop

    After effects was Aldus in 1993: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobe_After_Effects

    3D software:

    Cinema4D was released for the Amiga in 1993: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinema_4D

    Lightwave 3D started in 1990: https://www.lightwave3d.com/

    Poser was started in 1995: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poser_(software)

    3DS max in 1996: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autodesk_3ds_Max

    Maya was released in 1998: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autodesk_Maya

    Fusion compositing software has been around since 1996: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackmagic_Fusion

    OmniGraffle started in 2001: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OmniGraffle

    • risingsubmarine 282 days ago
      Blender and Houdini are also long-timers.
    • HeyLaughingBoy 282 days ago
      Is PageMaker (also Aldus) still around?
      • ss48 282 days ago
        Aldus was purchased by Adobe. PageMaker was discontinued in favor of InDesign and QuarkXPress, which are both still in development today.
        • detaro 282 days ago
          And QuarkXPress launched in 1987
  • perardi 282 days ago
    - Mathematica(https://www.wolfram.com/mathematica/scrapbook/) — Still going, and Stephen Wolfram won’t let you forget that

    - xScope (https://xscopeapp.com/history) — OK, I’m cheating, 19 years, but still a notable tool in my toobox

    - Transmit (https://panic.com/transmit/) — Though it debuted as “Transit”, it’s been going since 1998

    • e61133e3 281 days ago
      I remember the change from Transit to Transmit. That is how long I'm using that app :)
  • stblack 282 days ago
    Beyond Compare by Scooter Software.

    Beyond Compare is perfect software (in my not so humble opinion). I use it every day.

    https://www.scootersoftware.com/

    • usr1106 282 days ago
      I used it 20 years ago when I was forced to use Windows and Windows had zero adequate tooling for software development. For 15 the last years I have used only Linux and getting proprietary software feels very remote. I can get more than I'll ever be able to learn with just a single installation command.
  • simonsarris 282 days ago
    I still use IrfanView, which is 26 years old (1996)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IrfanView

  • mtmail 282 days ago
    Firefox 2004 = 18 years, though I remember using the older version Firebird (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefox_early_version_history) already. Thunderbird (July 2003)
    • grey_earthling 282 days ago
      And SeaMonkey is still very recognisably the same program as Mozilla Suite 1.0 from 2002.
    • ollien 282 days ago
      heh, I was gonna say Paint.NET but that was also 2004; just a year off!
  • olivierestsage 282 days ago
    Emacs comes to mind: it has a codebase stretching back to the 1970s and is still actively developed, with a dedicated following of users (myself included).
    • slightwinder 282 days ago
      Emacs is not really the classical desktop-app. It's a terminal-app that just happened to also have a GUI.
      • nequo 282 days ago
        I think most people use it with the GUI, and the GUI version has features that the terminal-only version doesn't.
        • slightwinder 282 days ago
          I also use the GUI, because of additional keys supported by it. But like most(?) people, I've deactivated the GUI-elements, as they are pretty useless. But ok, I guess it could be called a desktop-app because of this.
          • nequo 282 days ago
            I also routinely rely on the GUI version’s ability to display images inlined in the buffer. It is true that it doesn’t have the UX of other, newer GUIs, but it is still meaningfully different from the terminal version.
            • slightwinder 282 days ago
              Well, technically, this depends on the environment and is also working in proper terminal. But all the proper terminals are AFAIK GUI-terminals, so it's a thin line I guess.
      • anthk 282 days ago
        Emacs by default can show images. With Exwm can be your window manager. With EMMS, your audio and video player. With doc-view and even more, with PDF-tools, your document viewer. With Org-Mode, your brain on stereoids. With ERC, your IRC client. With Telega, your Telegram client. With Malyon, your Z-Machine interpreter. With M-x Calc and Gnuplot, your CAS lite. With Maxima and Texlive, your medium CAS with inline equation output and plotting.
      • arghwhat 282 days ago
        I consider any user-facing application that presents its own interface and that a user runs on their own computer a desktop-app. Whether the UI gets rounded corners, animations and smooth scrolling is not important, and neither is whether your UI elements are submitted for display through an Wayland/X11 socket or through command sequences over stdout.
        • slightwinder 282 days ago
          By that logic, any android or iOS-app would be also a desktop-application. As also any DOS-App and anything with curse-interface. What about interactive commandline-apps? Like a database-shell? They also have their own interface, it's just made of text.
          • arghwhat 282 days ago
            Any DOS app with a curses interface is a desktop application, yes. Any terminal tool with a TUI is a desktop application. A command-line tool without an interface (just arguments and pipes) is not, because it does not aim to be interactive. A terminal tool that just asks questions is a bad desktop applications, but simple form apps exist in the GUI world too.

            All UIs are made of text and symbolic visual elements. Whether you draw your button with unicode block characters, a GtkButton, a Flutter TextButton, or a HTML <button> does not matter in the slightest from the perspective of being a desktop app or having a UI.

            The reason an Android an iOS app is not a desktop app is because it does not run on a desktop. A minor distinction, but the way we use our pocket computers is different from how we use our desk computers and so we distinguish between them. The line gets beautifully blurred once you run the iOS app on macOS or Android app on Windows 11, but humans are bad at categorizing things in ways that remain consistent for more than a few years - just ask any biologist.

            • slightwinder 282 days ago
              > Any DOS app with a curses interface is a desktop application, yes. Any terminal tool with a TUI is a desktop application. A command-line tool without an interface (just arguments and pipes) is not, because it does not aim to be interactive. A terminal tool that just asks questions is a bad desktop applications, but simple form apps exist in the GUI world too.

              Ok, fair, but a very unusual definition.

              > All UIs are made of text and symbolic visual elements. Whether you draw your button with unicode block characters, a GtkButton, a Flutter TextButton, or a HTML <button> does not matter in the slightest from the perspective of being a desktop app or having a UI.

              But it does matter for a _G_UI whether you have actual graphical elements, or just text. There is a significant differences in ability coming with those.

              > The reason an Android an iOS app is not a desktop app is because it does not run on a desktop. A minor distinction, but the way we use our pocket computers is different from how we use our desk computers and so we distinguish between them.

              Android and iOS do not run only on smartphones. People working on tablets, use them similar to the normal laptop/notebook/PC table-setup. Taking a classical PC-Desktop as the base of your definition falls apart very fast today.

              > humans are bad at categorizing things in ways that remain consistent for more than a few years - just ask any biologist.

              The established definition of desktop, mobile, gui, tui and commandline is pretty consistent for some decades now I would say.

              • arghwhat 282 days ago
                I would say that the distinction between TUI and GUI - outside "how would I use this tool remotely" - is mainly one for the developer. Take ImGui (https://github.com/ocornut/imgui, an immediate mode GUI library) for example - the examples are much closer to TUI interfaces than a Swift UI app - the only difference between that an a terminal UI would be that the lines are thinner and that text has non-uniform spacing.

                Does that make ImGui a TUI? Or make TUIs a GUI? Why are those thin visual lines graphical, if the slightly thicker visual lines drawn by your graphical terminal emulator with support arbitrary color precision and inline image rendition is not?

                Maybe the issue is that it there is a terminal emulator to visualize the representation. But if an application that is not graphically heavy and needs an intermediary is a TUI, does that make most utility electron apps TUIs?

                The difference between a TUI and a GUI is just an implementation detail, and these do not matter in the distinction of desktop app or not. Heck, some modern terminal UIs are more graphically appealing than some GUI apps.

                And remember, the question was about desktop, not GUI specifically.

                > The established definition of desktop, mobile, gui, tui and commandline is pretty consistent for some decades now I would say.

                Considering that all good desktop apps were TUI apps 3 decades ago, that mobile apps are in their modern form has basically only existed for 1.5 decades, and that running mobile apps as desktop apps and the general merge between the disciplines is only a few years old at most, I'd say that this statement doesn't quite hold.

                • slightwinder 282 days ago
                  > Take ImGui (https://github.com/ocornut/imgui, an immediate mode GUI library) for example - the examples are much closer to TUI interfaces than a Swift UI app - the only difference between that an a terminal UI would be that the lines are thinner and that text has non-uniform spacing.

                  What I see there is a spatial interface with complex layout, z-axis and graphical elements. A bit hard to replicate on a normal terminal.

                  > Does that make ImGui a TUI?

                  TUI and GUI are not defined by the actual complexity of a real application, but the environment which gives them theoretical abilities. With a GUI, you can have pixel-perfect control over every element. With a TUI, you are normally limited to character-level of control. Of course can you also use pixels without a desktop, but you would still leave the terminal-environment and enter the framebuffer for this or something similar. Though, to be fair, at this point it indeed can become a bit fuzzy.

                  • arghwhat 282 days ago
                    > With a GUI, you can have pixel-perfect control over every element. With a TUI, you are normally limited to character-level of control.

                    So when I have pixel-perfect content render in a terminal emulator through Sixel graphics, and have inconsistent font rendition and problematic CSS box wrapping in a Web or Electron app, does that make the former GUI and the latter TUI? ;)

                    > TUI and GUI are not defined by the actual complexity of a real application, but the environment which gives them theoretical abilities.

                    And indeed, this gets to my point. The difference between a GUI and a TUI framework is more akin of the difference between, say, SwiftUI and WinForms, than something presenting a different mental model or experience for users. There are aesthetic differences, but there are just as stark differences between Win32, Aero, Metro and Sun Valley Windows GUI styles.

                    Sure, modern GUI applications can do more, but no user cares that Outlook could have had pressure-sensitive, angle-dependent Wacom tablet tool integration, and no so user would care that a TUI email client can't.

      • 0atman 282 days ago
        Or perhaps an operating system just missing a good text editor ;-)

        (to be clear, I love emacs, and use spacemacs as my distro!)

      • dumpsterlid 282 days ago
        [dead]
  • bruce511 281 days ago
    I'm sure you'll see lots of examples in answers to your question. You can add millions of not-household-name business programs to the list.

    Any OS that has been around a while, and is still active (aka Windows, Linux, MacOS etc) will have lots and lots of long-life software.

    It's an interesting dynamic because newer programmers have this impression that "software has a short life-span before it's eclipsed by something new and shiny."

    In truth, it's the opposite. Y2K showed us that software literally written in the 60s was still in play (30+ years) and stuff from the 80s (10-20) years was common.

    Even today COBOL programs exist, and that was unfashionable 30 years ago.

    Sure your web-frontend, JavaScript framework-based interface might not last long, but the real software doing the work lasts a long long time.

    This idea that you just rewrite everything every 5 years is a complete myth and yet every generation (including my own) has this impression when they start out.

    20 years is actually not that old. When I attend conference's and take a straw-poll, many programmers there have a single product that originated in the DOS era, and have been actively built on for more than 30 years. DOS, 16 bit Windows, then 32 bit, even 64 bit, Web, Mobile, the more it changes the more it stays the same.

    • mattmanser 279 days ago
      The opposite is not true. Most software does have a short lifespan.

      But there are a few exceptions.

  • simon_acca 282 days ago
    The parasolid geometrical kernel is from the 80's, underlies many of the major CAD products today. Same for Dassault's ACIS and its lineage.

    Also: VLC, Matlab, Mathematica, many of the major DAW programs like Cubase

    • rodface 282 days ago
      My mind immediately jumped to CAD (that being my domain)

      While a lot of packages have come and gone, the heavy hitters have been around a while:

        Siemens NX (Unigraphics) 1973
        DS CATIA 1982
        Autodesk AutoCAD 1982
        PTC Creo (Pro/Engineer) 1987
      
      The baby of the bunch is DS Solidworks 1995, still 27 years.
  • argiopetech 282 days ago
    Supermemo v7, Piotr Wozniak's spaced repetition (and a bunch of other things) platform, was rewritten in Turbo Pascal in 1993. The most recent version, 18, is an obvious continuation of the same interface (to me, the most striking difference from Windows 3.1 to modern is window decorations).

    https://supermemo.guru/wiki/SuperMemo_7

  • niklas_a00 282 days ago
    Reason (music making software). Released in 2000 and still an actively developed code base. Still some code from 23 years ago running in production :)
    • detaro 282 days ago
      music software is a full field of long-running products:

      Cubase: 1989

      Pro Tools: 1991

      Logic Pro: 1993

      FL Studio: 1997

      Ableton Live: 2001

      Max/MXP: 1980s, 90s as commercial product

      • ssttoo 282 days ago
        Also notation software:

        Musescore 2002

        Sibelius 1993

        Encore 1984

        Finale 1988

  • neilk 282 days ago
    VLC Media Player is 22 years old

    PuTTY SSH client is 24 years old

    The mIRC IRC Client is 28 years old

    Theatre Manager (https://www.artsman.com/about/) is, depending on how you count, up to 37 years old.

  • cozzyd 282 days ago
    Software I use regularly:

    Firefox is over 20 years old if you count Phoenix.

    Scribus will reach 20 years in a month

    Inkscape will be 20 years old later this year

    GIMP is 25

    Thunderbird is very close to 20...

    VLC is 22

    MATLAB is nearly 40 years old, though it's current GUI version is probably 22 years old?

    gpredict is 22

    ROOT is nearly 30 years old

    GNOME is 24 years old

  • nokya 281 days ago
    I still use Paint Shop Pro 6. Purchased it in 1999. I still use it today on a daily basis (screenshots cropping, resizing, cleaning, censoring, etc.).

    Basically copy-pasted the folder to every new laptop/computer I used since. I tried several other image manipulation tools but always came back to launching psp.exe.

    [EDIT: I see many people answered things like Firefox or Photoshop. As I understood your question, you meant software compiled 20 years ago or more and still running on modern computers. Otherwise, yes, I probably can include things like VLC, notepad++, Firefox, Office suite, etc. but it seems to me that is not the initial goal of your question.]

    • speedgoose 280 days ago
      I am sure you are happy with old software from 1999 but have you tried more modern software?

      The technology has improved a lot even for basic operations such as resizing or fixing colours.

      • nokya 278 days ago
        Probably. Everytime I installed a new Windows I tried using the latest Paint software, but it always felt more complicated for simple operations, whether it was more clicks needed, missing keyboard shortcuts, or one of the few features I use were missing (e.g., resize, resample, crop, upscale/downscale color palette, set color transparency, convert between JPEG/PNG/BMP, lasso, automatic lasso, clone brush, I guess that's all).

        The only alternatives I read about is Gimp and Photoshop. I didn't like Gimp's usability at all and Photoshop just seemed too privacy invading.

  • Sujeto 282 days ago
    FL Studio (aka Fruity Loops)

    >The first version of FruityLoops (1.0.0) was developed by Didier Dambrin and was partially released on December 18, 1997.[13] Its official launch was in early 1998

  • RyanHamilton 282 days ago
    I finally released version 2.0 of my own desktop software after 10 years development (Free SQL tool): https://www.timestored.com/b/qstudio-2-05-dark-theme-and-hig... 1.0 supported one database only, 2.0 added postgres/mysql/etc. so felt like the time to bump versions :) It's been the same code base in java that whole time, no big rewrites. I guess it helps that I was working in the SQL area for 5 years before writing the tool, so I knew what I wanted. I must say java/jfreechart/swing have kept working perfectly all this time with very minor changes. The most painful was a)xstream/logging/security vulneribilities causing dependency changes b) misc.sun deprecation, I used internal class DSA for encryption of license keys, had to migrate users to new keys. Changing a contract with users is always painful. I'm very very glad that I automated tests from the start, it's the only thing that catches edge cases I've forgotten after all this time.
  • lapcat 282 days ago
    Rogue Amoeba: Audio Hijack (2002)

    TLA Systems: PCalc (1992)

    Flying Meat, Primate Labs: VoodooPad (2003)

    C-Command Software: SpamSieve (2002)

    The Omni Group: OmniOutliner (2000)

    Mozilla: Firefox (2002)

    Opera (1995)

  • 1970-01-01 282 days ago
  • dgrin91 282 days ago
    Steam! It will hit 20 years this September.

    Also some games are crazy old and still developed Dwarf fortress is 2006 (almost 20 years old), Open TTD is 19 years old, probably some others as well.

  • Maxburn 282 days ago
    I work with building automation HVAC software and it's expected to last the lifetime of buildings so it's very common in my industry. Automated Logic WebCTRL in it's present web server form has crossed the 20 year mark and the controllers it is compatible with are in the 35+ year range.
  • lr1970 282 days ago
    After 45 years TeX (1978) [0] and LaTeX (1984) [1] are by far the most popular typesetting system in academic publishing. For example, a vast majority of all papers on arXiv.org are typeset in LaTeX. Thank you very much Professor Knuth [2]!

    [0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TeX [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaTeX [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Knuth

  • hoten 282 days ago
    My hobby is working on a 20+ year game engine. Still occasionally delete DOS-only code in it. https://github.com/ArmageddonGames/ZQuestClassic
  • okeuro49 282 days ago
    IntelliJ IDEA.

    1.0 / January 2001; 22 years ago

  • vivegi 282 days ago
    FFmpeg - my favorite video/audio file transcoder.

    Initial release in Dec 2000.

    FFmpeg 6.0 "Von Neumann" 6.0 was released on 2023-02-27

    Edit: I see OP mentions Desktop software. It runs on Linux, Windows and Mac, so I guess that qualifies.

  • MattJ100 282 days ago
    Pidgin deserves a mention - 24 years and still under development. The project has been undergoing a huge rewrite for 3.x, which has stalled visible progress somewhat, but I'm really hoping it will be worth it, as I'm excited to see it supporting modern IM features with protocols such as XMPP.

    The lead developer regularly streams live coding sessions and quarterly project updates: https://pidgin.im/post/

  • slightwinder 282 days ago
    AbiWord, Blender, FileZilla, GIMP, LibreOffice (formerly known as OpenOffice, formerly known as Star Office), Opera, PuTTY, Seamonkey (formerly known as Mozilla Suit), Stellarium, Thunderbird, WinSCP

    KDE and Gnome probably have some old running apps too. There are many long-running open source desktop-apps I think, because there is no economical stress for its development.

    In the commercial section I could name Directory Opus, DEVONthink, Maple, Mathematica, Pegasus Mail, The Bat!, Tinderbox

  • jgrahamc 282 days ago
    QuickBooks is 40 years old. It was released in 1983. TurboTax is 39 years old. Microsoft Word was released in 1989. I suspect there's a lot of old Windows software.
  • jakelazaroff 282 days ago
    Panic's Transmit debuted in the late 90s and is still going strong: https://www.panic.com/transmit/

    Coincidentally, this post is currently adjacent to one on the Thunderbird logo redesign: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=36063943

  • iamflimflam1 282 days ago
    I worked on some windows software back around 1995 or so that is still in use today.

    Apparently we released it in 1997! https://www.amdocs.com/sites/default/files/2021-07/Actix-Ana...

  • inetknght 282 days ago
    REALbasic / REAL Studio / Xojo ... a derivative of Basic. I first started using it back in '98 to write software for Mac OS 8. It's still around and can now build software for Windows and Linux too.

    It's a great language to learn when you're getting started. But I've long since moved on to more low-level, performant, and industry-standard languages.

  • rufus_foreman 282 days ago
    Right now, other than the browser, the applications open on my desktop are:

    GNOME Terminal (lists copyrights going back to 2002)

    Notepad++ (running under WINE, first release in 2003)

    Claws Mail (2001)

    LibreOffice (forked from OpenOffice in 2010, OpenOffice was open sourced in 2000 and was based on StarOffice which was released in 1985)

    Intellij IDEA (first release in 2001)

    GNOME calculator (lists copyrights going back to 1986)

  • PopAlongKid 282 days ago
    WinZIP 8.0 goes back to 2000, so I think it's even older than that for earlier versions. Several mentions here of WinRAR, but didn't see WinZIP yet.

    I use WinZIP with built-in encryption every day for incremental backups, also for password management (my password manager is a plain text file encrypted via WinZIP).

  • vivegi 282 days ago
    Does VisualStudio IDE count? I recall using MSVC 1.5 in 1995.
  • kingkongjaffa 282 days ago
    Nastran simulation software

    The NASTRAN system was released to NASA in 1968.

    NASTRAN software application was written to help design more efficient space vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. NASTRAN was released to the public in 1971 by NASA's Office of Technology Utilization. The commercial use of NASTRAN has helped to analyze the behavior of elastic structures of any size, shape, or purpose. For example, the automotive industry uses the program to design front suspension systems and steering linkages. It is also used in designing railroad tracks and cars, bridges, power plants, skyscrapers, and aircraft.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nastran

  • justinclift 281 days ago
    DB Browser for SQLite (https://sqlitebrowser.org) was first released to the public domain on 2003-08-19. So, it'll be 20 years in a few months time. :)
  • throwaway32l3m 281 days ago
    Those I use which are still in development / actively supported would be...

    CuteFTP (1996)

    Quicken (1983)

    TextPad (1992)

    TurboTax (1984)

    VLC media player (2001)

    WinSCP (2000)

    Wireshark (formerly Ethereal) (1998)

    There are a handful more up-and-comers in the 16-19yr bracket as well. And tons that I still use, but aren't actively maintained anymore.

  • cpr 282 days ago
    While not standalone apps, our data publishing plugins for Adobe InDesign (http://emsoftware.com) are now 23+ years old and going strong...
  • ochrist 282 days ago
    Sony Vegas was apparently released as early as 1999: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegas_Pro
  • sanssoucis 282 days ago
    The first version of the visual programming language / software vvvv first appeared in 1998:

    https://visualprogramming.net/

  • itronitron 282 days ago
    GIMP, and probably Inkscape
  • iancmceachern 282 days ago
  • Dork1234 281 days ago
    Anything CAD related.

    AutoCAD comes to mind first, but Siemens NX (Unigraphics) existed before and is still currently sold. Dassault CATIA is another CAD software older than 40 years.

    PTC Creo (Pro/E), McNeel Rhino 3d, Dassault Sold Works, Archicad, also are software packages with really long life spans.

    You can also include plugins and support tools such as simulation modules, and render plugins. Many of which have been around for 20+ years, but are too numerous to list.

  • jjgreen 282 days ago
    Vmware workstation, released 1999
  • lockhouse 282 days ago
    FreeBSD’s initial release was in 1993, but the original Berkeley Software Distribution it is based off of goes all the way back to 1976.
  • Z7YCx5ieof4Std 282 days ago
    Total Commander - since 1993
  • zimpenfish 282 days ago
    I guess technically you could extend Xara back to 1991 since IIRC it's basically the Windows version of ArtWorks on RISC OS.
  • PopAlongKid 282 days ago
    RealPlayer media player is still around after at least 24 years, I still use it (but haven't updated in a number of years).
  • bradleyankrom 282 days ago
    BATS, the video cutting & tagging software used by nearly all MLB teams, has been around since… I wanna say the early-90s.
  • genmud 281 days ago
    IDA pro, for disassembly is about 25 or 30 years old. I remember using it back in 2000 or 2002
  • pk-protect-ai 282 days ago
    I'm still using Gnome 2 (Mate Desktop) it was first released in 2002.
  • mchanson 282 days ago
    I think a lot of b2b ERP software gets to be this old. I know of multiple.
  • sumosudo 281 days ago
  • iggldiggl 281 days ago
  • codegladiator 282 days ago
    Calibre ~16 years

    VLC ~22 years

  • e61133e3 281 days ago
    NetNewsWire, 12 July 2002, almost 21 years, https://netnewswire.com
  • mingabunga 282 days ago
    MailWasher anti-spam is 23 years old and still going strong. https://Firetrust.com
  • belfalas 282 days ago
    Microsoft Excel - still going strong after 30+ years.
  • blueflow 282 days ago
    - xterm, a DEC video terminal emulator (1984)

    - Xorg itself (2004)

    • toast0 282 days ago
      > - Xorg itself (2004)

      Xorg is a 2004 fork of XFree86, which is a 1992 fork of X386, first released in 1991.

  • d--b 282 days ago
    Basically creative suites:

    - Photoshop

    - Gimp

    - Blender

    - Maya 3D

    - 3ds Max

    - Audacity

    - Ableton Live

    Office stuff:

    - Microsoft Office

    - SAP ERPs

    • irrational 282 days ago
      This was my first thought. I remember using Photoshop in the 1990s.
  • pengaru 282 days ago
    It's a depressingly short list relative to the amount of software that's been written throughout history.
  • finger 282 days ago
    Cubase (1989) DAW

    Finale (1988) Music notation software

  • ydnaclementine 282 days ago
    foobar (2002), and it's not OSS
  • cm2012 281 days ago
    Starcraft 1 is over 20 years old and still has cash prize tournaments today.
  • irrational 282 days ago
    Some games: Myst, Zork, etc.
  • PopAlongKid 282 days ago
    SecureCRT (terminal emulator) is still around after at least 24 years.
  • isomorph 282 days ago
    Logic Pro (1993)

    Now it belongs to Apple but it was only acquired about 20 years ago

  • oidar 280 days ago
    World of Warcraft is coming up on 20 years in 2024.
  • nickpp 282 days ago
    Advanced Installer: 20 years old, still getting regular releases.

    https://www.advancedinstaller.com/version-history.html

  • Temporary_31337 282 days ago
    WinRar is from 1995
  • PopAlongKid 282 days ago
    NcFTP (ftp client) has been around over 30 years.
  • tomduncalf 282 days ago
    Some music software such as Cubase, Logic Pro
  • alex3305 282 days ago
    My personal favorite: WinRAR (1995).
  • anthk 282 days ago
    - MPlayer

    - CTWM

    - ImageMagick

    - Dillo

  • frankreyes 281 days ago
    Bloomberg Terminal, 1982
  • lylejantzi3rd 282 days ago
    Bink by RAD game tools.
  • olgeni 281 days ago
    Also GNU/Octave
  • eithed 282 days ago
    WinSCP - 23y
  • GiorgioG 282 days ago
    mIRC

    Initial release date: February 28, 1995

  • aaron695 282 days ago
    It's might be easier to list what failed?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:2003_software

    CD/DVD writing software is gone, from life, possibly still being developed. Yep still going strong https://www.cyberlink.com/blog/media-player-windows/983/best...

  • MPlus88 282 days ago
    [dead]