Ask HN: Best Course for Leetcode Questions?

58 points | by lance_klusener 11 days ago

12 comments

  • torinmr 11 days ago
    Princeton's COS 226 covered this topic quite well when I took it. It was a good intro to both algorithms and DS content, as well as practical skills for leetcode style questions.

    You can check out the Syllabus for the course as taught at Princeton here[0], or take the Algorithms I and II courses on Coursera[1] which cover ~2/3 of the content but have video lectures.

    [0]: https://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/spring23/cos226... [1]: https://www.coursera.org/learn/algorithms-part1

  • DawsonBruce 11 days ago
    I watched the MIT 6.006 Introduction to Algorithms course (0) while studying leetcode a couple years ago. I’d watch the lecture, take notes, and then find some related leetcode questions and solve them. I found it considerably beneficial to do the two in tandem and made some pretty significant progress with my understanding of data structures and algorithms. Hope this helps.

    [0] https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP61Oq3tWYp6V_F-5...

  • nkzd 11 days ago
    I've used AlgoExpert in the past. They thoroughly explain naive and optimal approaches to every problem. However, after I grasped the basics, I started practicing on my own using a Blind75 list.
  • justsomecoder 10 days ago
    NeetCode has created a good website with a list of 150 practice questions that you can go through. The list contains links to his very explanatory walkthrough videos and code for (the solutions to) the problems. I'm not sure that you would get the best ROI from an online university course, but it might depend on your timeline (i.e. if you are actively preparing for an interview).

    https://www.neetcode.io/

  • mech422 11 days ago
    Not a course, but I find leetcode.com[0] a decent way to putz about and learn new languages. You can only write 'hello world' so many times, and often you don't want to write a whole program just to 'get a taste' of a new language. The leetcode (and advent of code) stuff seems a nice compromise.

    0: https://leetcode.com/explore/

    • roland35 11 days ago
      Leetcode explore helped me pass a few coding rounds! I recommend taking one track at a time until it sinks in before moving to the next one.
  • adamhp 11 days ago
    Frankly, LeetCode itself has pretty good guides on all of the information, that then use the problems as the "quiz". I found a pro subscription for a few months to be pretty worthwhile.
  • realalandonald 11 days ago
    Lance, if you hadn't got me runout in THAT match, you wouldn't have had to go through all these leet code programming.
    • devnull3 11 days ago
      For folks who do did not get the reference, here is THAT runout:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxiyKWBPshg

      Not that watching this will greatly increase the understanding of the game who do not know cricket.. but still.

      (Basically the the guy in greens who was not batting simply did not run ... his is Alan Donald)

      • lance_klusener 11 days ago
        My apologies

        Want to avoid getting out with the leetcode and system design peice :(

    • lance_klusener 11 days ago
      Sorry man !
  • rg111 11 days ago
    Just watch the videos from Neetcode on YouTube.
  • projpre301 11 days ago
    This channel has great videos that address requirements 1 & 3 you mentioned: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38OtM4w1rBI
  • nocobot 11 days ago
    When I was in college I used interview cake a bit and enjoyed it. It’s free for students irrc.

    In general I think most of the interview prep industry is kind of a grift.

  • password-234 11 days ago
    cracking the code interview, learn the patterns and its mostly applicable to most questions